Frank Davis Makes Good Groceries!: A New Orleans Cookbook.

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  • Author(s): Knoblauch, Mark
  • Source:
    Booklist. 4/1/2008, Vol. 104 Issue 15, p14-15. 2p.
  • Document Type:
    Book Review
  • Citations
    • ABNT:
      KNOBLAUCH, M. Frank Davis Makes Good Groceries!: A New Orleans Cookbook. Booklist, [s. l.], v. 104, n. 15, p. 14, 2008. Disponível em: https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=31752814. Acesso em: 31 out. 2020.
    • AMA:
      Knoblauch M. Frank Davis Makes Good Groceries!: A New Orleans Cookbook. Booklist. 2008;104(15):14. Accessed October 31, 2020. https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=31752814
    • APA:
      Knoblauch, M. (2008). Frank Davis Makes Good Groceries!: A New Orleans Cookbook. Booklist, 104(15), 14.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Author-Date:
      Knoblauch, Mark. 2008. “Frank Davis Makes Good Groceries!: A New Orleans Cookbook.” Booklist 104 (15): 14. https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=31752814.
    • Harvard:
      Knoblauch, M. (2008) ‘Frank Davis Makes Good Groceries!: A New Orleans Cookbook’, Booklist, 104(15), p. 14. Available at: https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=31752814 (Accessed: 31 October 2020).
    • Harvard: Australian:
      Knoblauch, M 2008, ‘Frank Davis Makes Good Groceries!: A New Orleans Cookbook’, Booklist, vol. 104, no. 15, p. 14, viewed 31 October 2020, .
    • MLA:
      Knoblauch, Mark. “Frank Davis Makes Good Groceries!: A New Orleans Cookbook.” Booklist, vol. 104, no. 15, Apr. 2008, p. 14. EBSCOhost, search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=31752814.
    • Chicago/Turabian: Humanities:
      Knoblauch, Mark. “Frank Davis Makes Good Groceries!: A New Orleans Cookbook.” Booklist 104, no. 15 (April 2008): 14. https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=31752814.
    • Vancouver/ICMJE:
      Knoblauch M. Frank Davis Makes Good Groceries!: A New Orleans Cookbook. Booklist [Internet]. 2008 Apr [cited 2020 Oct 31];104(15):14. Available from: https://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&site=eds-live&db=f5h&AN=31752814

Reviews

Booklist Reviews 2008 April #1

Fruit plays a pivotal role in human history, from Adam's apple to George Washington Carver's peanuts and beyond. Both poetry and prose would be impoverished if metaphors and similes involving fruit were expunged. Gollner looks at the present state of fruit in the world, ranging from everyday banalities of bananas to exotica such as passion fruit. He travels to the tropics to learn about fruits firsthand. Along the way, he encounters fruitarians, who advocate a strictly fruit diet. Other fruit-obsessed characters include the brilliant David Karp, a former junkie who now gets his kicks from fresh fruit. Some fanatics go so far as to smuggle fruits across national borders, risking importation of fruit-borne pathogens. The fruit of the moment, the Australian finger lime, entrances master chefs with its culinary potential. Despite their seeming naturalness, many common fruits would be unknown or extinct without human intervention in grafting, breeding, and conservation. Copyright 2008 Booklist Reviews.

PW Reviews 2008 February #3

Journalist Gollner's debut is a rollicking account of the world of fruit and fruit fanatics. He's traveled to many countries in search of exotic fruits, and he describes in sensuous detail some of the hundreds of varieties he's sampled, among them peanut butter fruit, blackberry-jam fruit and coco-de-mer—a suggestively shaped coconut known as the "lady fruit" that grows only in the Seychelles. Equally intriguing are some of the characters he has encountered—a botanist in Borneo who spends his life studying malodorous durians; fruitarians who believe that a fruit diet promotes transcendental experiences; fruitleggers who bypass import laws; and fruit inventors such as the fabricator of the Grapple—which looks like an apple and tastes like a grape. The FDA and the often dubious activities of the international fruit trade, multinational corporations like Chiquita, come in for scrutiny, as does New York City's largest wholesale produce market, in a chapter with more information than one may want on biochemical growth inhibitors, hormone-based retardants, dyes, waxes and corrupt USDA inspectors. Gollner's passion for fruit is infectious, and his fascinating book is a testament to the fact that there is much more to the world of fruit than the bland varieties on our supermarket shelves. (May)

[Page 143]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.